Menu

What This Artist Is Doing With Billboards Will Make You Want To Look At Them

Nothing ruins natural beauty quite like a billboard. If you’ve ever driven along a scenic road, only to have your view of trees, fields, and the sky suddenly interrupted by a big, loud advertisement for fast food, then you know that these monstrous structures can be the most jarring sights on an otherwise pleasant trip.

That was what artist Brian Kane thought, too. In fact, billboards and their aggressive advertising bothered Kane so much that they became the focus of Healing Tool, his temporary installation project that can be seen along the highways near Boston.

The billboards feature a cycling series of digital images depicting the area’s natural surrounding, filling in the area that would be blocked by the billboard.

The billboards feature a cycling series of digital images depicting the area's natural surrounding, filling in the area that would be blocked by the billboard.

At night, though, the images change to high-resolution images of the moon, stars, and the Milky Way galaxy all things that are impossible to see due to urban light pollution.

The name Healing Tool comes from a Photoshop tool, which is used to fix blemishes and glitches in photographs.

The name <em>Healing Tool</em> comes from a Photoshop tool, which is used to fix blemishes and glitches in photographs.

It also refers to the fact that the images are smoothing over the rectangular interruption caused by the billboard. Kane hopes that the images can provide a calmer, more introspective, and less distracted journey for drivers on the road, where they can enjoy the natural beauty instead of being confronted with advertisements.

See Healing Tool in action here:

Brian Kane, Healing Tool, 2015 (HD)

(via Colossal)

“By removing the marketing message from the advertising space, we create an unexpected moment of introspection,” Kane explains. “People are allowed to interpret an image based on their own experience, and not necessarily with the singular focus of the advertiser’s intent.”

You can see more of Kane’s work on his website, and some more videos of his projects on Vimeo.