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This Haunting, Peaceful Visualization Gives You Bach Like You’ve Never Seen Before

If you listen to a lot of music, you probably associate certain visual imagery with particular songs. Digital visualization — a new tech phenomenon — creates multi-sensory experiences by using lights to respond to the pitch and duration of notes.

Animator Alan Warburton, for example, set Johann Sebastian Bach”s The Well-Tempered Clavier to a set of corresponding lights in a gallery space. The dreamlike atmosphere and the beauty of the music make for a surreal experience.

The length and color of the lights correspond to each note”s duration and pitch.

The length and color of the lights correspond to each note

The scene doubles as a Bach exhibition.

The scene doubles as a Bach exhibition.

Because you can see each note as it”s being played, your understanding of the composition is increased tenfold.

The lights keep shining as the camera pans out of the gallery space.

The lights keep shining as the camera pans out of the gallery space.

They go all the way into the parking garage.

They go all the way into the parking garage.

The empty, familiar spaces become utterly unrecognizable with the addition of music and lights.

And if you”re feeling stressed, this is actually the perfect video to watch. The music, played by Pierre-Laurent Aimard, is beautiful, and the modern setting is a perfect contrast to its richness.

See the whole performance here.

(via Colossal)

The entire process took thousands of calculations to complete. According to Sinfini Music, who commissioned the piece, the computations were so extensive that the project required the use of an army of computers.

You can see more of Warburton”s animations on his website and Vimeo channel. More of Aimard”s music is available on his website, too.

There are many ways to appreciate music, from traditional videos to science experiments. Check them all out here: