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Scientists Found Dinosaur Footprints in the Strangest Place: Going Up a Wall.

Just outside of Surve, Bolivia, there is a town called Cal Orcko. It is home to 462 dinosaur trails imprinted into the limestone of what was once a muddy plain. That”s over 5,000 dinosaur footsteps!

What makes the prints at Cal Orcko even more impressive is that they can be found on a wall that”s nearly 300 ft high. That”s right, vertical prints. Don”t get too excited about (or terrified) of wall-walking dinos. There”s a catch. After sixty eight million years, shifting in the tectonic plates has caused the once muddy plain to turn upright, giving us the El Molino Dinosaur Wall.

The El Molino Dinosaur Wall.

The El Molino Dinosaur Wall.

Also known as the “Dinosaur Dance Floor,” because the irregular tracks left by the dinos suggest they weren”t simply walking across the plain.

Also known as the "Dinosaur Dance Floor," because the irregular tracks left by the dinos suggest they weren

Kind of hard to believe that this once bordered a humongous lake.

Kind of hard to believe that this once bordered a humongous lake.

Extremely hard, even–but it did.

Extremely hard, even--but it did.

The tracks were solidified after a period of extreme heat dried up the muddy shore.

The tracks were solidified after a period of extreme heat dried up the muddy shore.

The wall features the tracks of many dinosaurs, even a baby Tyrannosaurus Rex, whose tracks go on for 347 meters (the longest set of dinosaur tracks ever discovered).

The wall features the tracks of many dinosaurs, even a baby Tyrannosaurus Rex, whose tracks go on for 347 meters (the longest set of dinosaur tracks ever discovered).

It”s no wonder that this place is a hit with tourists.

It

Where else can you get up close to the tracks of these beasts that once roamed the earth.

Where else can you get up close to the tracks of these beasts that once roamed the earth.

Wow.

Wow.

It”s like nature created it”s own dinosaur museum.

It

(via Kuriousitas)

Despite the fact that they”ve been around for tens of millions of years, don”t count on these prints being around that much longer. Landslides caused by mining and erosion have been chipping away at them in a relatively quick fashion.